Naturalization & Citizenship

Big-Picture, Clean-Slate Immigration Reforms for the Biden-Harris Administration

AILA members Angelo A. Paparelli and Stephen Yale-Loehr offer some insights and ideas for the incoming Biden-Harris administration on actions that would make the immigration system more transparent, efficient, and welcoming.

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When State Marijuana Acceptance and Immigration Law Collide

AILA Editorial Director Danielle Polen interviewed Kaelyn Mostafa, author of an article in the Fall 2020 edition of the AILA Law Journal entitled “The Effect of States’ Legalization of Marijuana on Good Moral Character and Eligibility for U.S. Citizenship” to learn more about her process and topic.

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Remote Pro Bono Work in the Midst of a Pandemic

Jacqueline Shi, AILA member and member of the AILA National Pro Bono Committee, shares how attorneys continue to provide pro bono services to vulnerable immigrant communities during the pandemic by using technology and innovation.

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Sometimes You Just Have to Take ‘Em to Court

AILA First Vice President Jeremy McKinney describes his first foray into litigation, and what tools and resources can help AILA members litigate and win cases, writing that litigation “can benefit your clients, it can benefit the immigration bar, and ultimately, it can benefit everyone.”

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Do Not Pass Go, Do Not Collect $1 Billion Dollars Without Changes at USCIS

AILA Director of Government Relations Sharvari Dalal-Dheini shares insights from her time at USCIS related to the agency’s request to Congress for $1.2 billion, and urges Congress to “ensure that the agency is transparent about its spending, accountable for its inefficiencies, and on track towards fiscal responsibility.”

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No End in Sight: New Analysis Shows USCIS Case Processing Backlog Keeps Growing

AILA Executive Director Benjamin Johnson highlights USCIS processing delays, writing, “Even before the COVID-19 virus, backlogs and processing delays were staggering at USCIS. They have continued to grow thanks to burdensome policies and inefficient procedures that needlessly bog down the adjudications process.”

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